Historic Sites
Learn through history by visiting interesting historic sites around the state of Georgia. Historic sites let you put a real face on the history that you've read about, making it more exciting for you and your children.
Historic Sites in Georgia
Atlanta History Center
Explore award-winning exhibitions in the Atlanta History Museum, a two-story facility with 30,000 square feet of exhibition space, an 118-seat theater, a museum shop, The Coca-Cola Cafe, and classrooms. Collection includes objects dating from the early 19th century to the present. At its core are those items that refer to the history of Atlanta and its environs, but the collection also includes items that refer to the history of Georgia, the South and the nation. The collection also includes historic homes and gardens.
Ocmulgee National Monument
Ocmulgee is a memorial to the antiquity of man in this corner of the North American continent. The National Monument preserves a continuous record of human life in the Southeast from the earliest times to the present. From Ice-Age hunters to the Muscogee (Creek) people of historic times, there is evidence here of 12,000 years of human habitation. The Monument today consists of two units separated by two miles of riverine wetlands along the Ocmulgee River. The Main Unit is adjacent to the city of Macon, an urban area with a population of 118,000. The isolated Lamar Mounds and Village Unit can be visited by special permit.
Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historic Site
Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historic Site preserves the childhood home of Martin Luther King. The home is located in the residential section of "Sweet Auburn", the center of black Atlanta. Two blocks west of the home is Ebenezer Baptist Church, the pastorate of Martin's grandfather and father, and the church to which Dr. King returned to co-pastor with his father in 1960.
Fort Frederica National Monument
Fort Frederica on St. Simons Island was established in 1736 by James Oglethorpe to protect the southern boundary of his new colony of Georgia. Colonists from England, Scotland, and the Germanic states came to Frederica to support this endeavor. After successfully repulsing a Spanish attempt to retake St. Simons Island. The garrison at Ft. Frederica was disbanded, and the town fell into decline. Today, the archeological remnants of Frederica are protected by the National Park Service.
Jimmy Carter National Historic Site
The Jimmy Carter National Historic Siteincludes President Carter’s residence, boyhood farm, school, and the railroad depot, which served as his campaign headquarters during the 1976 election. The Plains High School serves as the park’s museum and visitor center. The Jimmy Carter National Preservation District includes part of the town of Plains and its environs. The area surrounding the residence is under the protection of the Secret Service and the home is not open to the public.
Andersonville National Historic Site
Andersonville, or Camp Sumter as it was officially known, was one of the largest of many Confederate military prisons established during the Civil War. Today, Andersonville National Historic Site is the only park in the National Park System to serve as a memorial to all American prisoners of war throughout the nation's history. The 515-acre park consists of the historic prison site and the National Cemetery.
Fort Pulaski National Monument
The defining events of Fort Pulaski occurred during the American Civil War. In April of 1862, Union troops directed rifled cannon fire at the fort breaching the southeast angle. Immediately after capturing the fort, Union Major General David Hunter, an ardent abolitionist, ordered the release of area slaves. Many were recruited into the Union army comprising the First South Carolina Colored Regiment. The park includes scenic marsh and uplands that support a variety of animal life characteristic of southern barrier islands. White-tailed deer, alligators, and raccoons as well as resident and migratory birds grace the landscape. Spanish moss drapes from yaupon holly bushes and vegetation includes cabbage palms, various wetland grasses, and a variety of temperate hardwood and pine trees. Fort Pulaski is located about fifteen miles east of Savannah.
Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park
Kennesaw Mountain Battlefield is a 2,888 acre National Battlefield that preserves a Civil War battleground of the Atlanta Campaign. The battle was fought here from June 18, 1864 until July 2, 1864. Shermans army consisted of 100,000 men, 254 guns and 35,000 horses. Johnstons army had 50,000 men and 187 guns. Over 67,000 soldiers were killed, wounded and captured during the Campaign. While walking some of the 17.3 miles of interpretive walking trails you will see historic earthworks, cannon emplacements and various interpretive signs. The 2,888 acre park includes the site of some of the heaviest fighting of the Atlanta Campaign of the Civil War. The park was set aside as an important cultural property dedicated to public inspiration and interpretation of the significant historic events that occurred here.
Chickamauga & Chattanooga National Military Park
Between 1890 and 1899 the Congress of the United States authorized the establishment of the first four national military parks: Chickamauga and Chattanooga, Shiloh, Gettysburg, and Vicksburg. The first and largest of these, and the one upon which the establishment and development of most other national military and historical parks was based, was Chickamauga and Chattanooga. It owes its existence largely to the efforts of General H.V. Boynton and Ferdinand Van Derveer, both veterans of the Army of the Cumberland, who saw the need for a national park to preserve and commemorate these battlefields during a visit to the area in 1888. The Park is located at Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia.
Looking for Another State?
Featured Resources

As an Amazon Associate, we earn from qualifying purchases. We get commissions for purchases made through links on this site.

Noah Webster's Reading Handbook
This is the historic text (originally called the Blue-Backed Speller) that has been updated to teach phonics/beginning reading. The blends and words in this reader are arranged to correlate with the sequence in which the special phonics sounds are taught. This reader is an invaluable teaching tool for children who need extra practice in the application of phonics rules. Find out more here.
Veritas Press
Veritas Press offers a history based classical curriculum for kindergarten through twelfth grades.
Waldorf Education: A Family Guide
Waldorf Education finds itself catapulted from its humble beginnings 80 years ago into the midst of the central educational and social issues of this decade.What draws parents and educators toward Waldorf Education today? "Waldorf Education - A Family Guide" offers a "first look" for parents and educators into the history, philosophy, curriculum, and traditions of this unique education. This comprehensive book is a collection of articles describing the world of Waldorf Education - the fastest gr...
Smart Mouth
Ages: 8 years and up; For 2 or more playersSmart Mouth is a quick-thinking shout-it-out hilarious word game that helps build vocabulary skills. It includes variations of the rules for category play and for younger players. Players slide the Letter Getter forward and back to get two letters. The first player to shout out a word of five or more letters using those letters wins the round. The game includes tips for teachers. This is a fun game to play with children and adults together.
A Little Way of Homeschooling
This book is a compilation of the experiences of 13 different homeschoolers and how they incorporated an unschooling style of teaching in their homes. This book addresses the question of whether a Catholic can happily and successfully unschool. This home education approach is presented as a sensible way to access the mystery of learning, in which it operates not as an ideology in competition with the Catholic faith, but rather a flexible and individual homeschooling path.