Colleges & Careers
More and more universities and colleges welcome and encourage applications from homeschoolers. We'll help you understand the process of applying for college and the special needs of homeschoolers, including preparing transcripts, entering college early, and working with institutions that may not be used to unconventional learning models.
What's Popular
Colleges that Admit Homeschoolers FAQ
Wondering which colleges admit homeschoolers? The list is growing every day. This compilation by Learn in Freedom lists more than 1,000 schools of higher education with links to over 980 college Web sites.
Annie & Everything
Ann Karako offers support and guidance for families with homeschooling teenagers. With articles, support, and resources, you'll find the information and confidence you need to homeschool your high school student here. 
Home-Schooled Students & Admission: Your Child's Unique Approach to the Process
Each college evaluates home-schooled applicants differently. Some colleges admit many home schoolers. Others have yet to admit one. Either way, your child needs to take extra admission steps.
How Do Home School Graduates Enter the Military?
Article includes anecdotes and information about joining the military without a high school diploma.
American Association of Community Colleges (AACC)
Founded in 1920, the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) has, over four decades, become the leading proponent and the national “voice for community colleges.” Today, AACC’s membership represents close to 95 percent of all accredited U.S. two-year community, junior and technical colleges and their 10.5 million students, as well as a growing number of international members in Puerto Rico, Japan, Great Britain, Korea, and the United Arab Emirates. The colleges are the largest and fas...
Links and Items
Annie & Everything

Ann Karako offers support and guidance for families with homeschooling teenagers. With articles, support, and resources, you'll find the information and confidence you need to homeschool your high school student here. 

And What About College?: How Homeschooling Can Lead to Admissions to the Best Colleges & Universities
Get all your questions about helping your homeschooled student apply and get accepted to college answered with this resource. It discusses transcripts, diplomas, education choices, online colleges, and more. If you are worried about whether your homeschooled student can have a successful college search, then this book will help allay those fears and offers good support and information. 
Links
Analysis of Inequities in the Requirements for Admission to the University System of Georgia
This report outlines and contrasts admission requirements for graduates of accredited or regulated high schools (accredited applicants) with admission requirements for applicants who are not graduates of accredited or regulated high schools (non-accredited applicants). Non-accredited applicants include students with a Graduation Equivalency Diploma (GED), most students from home study programs, and students from high schools, such as parochial schools, that, usually by choice, are not accredited. Of these legitimate, non-accredited secondary programs, many provide innovative, individualized curricula and instructional methods distinct from those offered by government-operated secondary schools. Prepared by the Home Education Information Resource (HEIR).
Coalition for Equitable USG Admissions
Coalition for Equitable USG Admissions' purpose is to achieve an admissions policy for applicants who are not graduates of accredited high schools that is appropriate and equitable.
5 Essential Keys to Your Perfect College Search
The whole college selection process can be a daunting challenge for Catholic families, both to those searching for the first-time, and even to those who have gone through the process before. Going to college can change a person’s life forever, including where he ends up for eternity. After all those years of sacrificing to give their children the best possible Catholic education, many parents are confronted with a huge decision. This advice will help prospective college students and their parents make this decision.
Articles
What does the SAT measure? Aptitude? Achievement? Anything?
When the first SAT was created, it was named the Scholastic Aptitude Test, signaling that its creators and the education world believed it to be a test of aptitude, or, a student’s ability to perform well in college. Aptitude tests supposedly measure talents that indicate possible achievement in the future, while achievement tests supposedly reveal how much someone has learned in the past. All these years later, we know the test never really did measure anybody’s aptitude to do well in college.
The SAT vs. the ACT: Which to Choose?
Colleges will accept either the SAT or ACT. So which should you take? It's all about the numbers. Some students end up scoring substantially higher on the SAT; others do better on the ACT. The Princeton Review Assessment (PRA) is designed to help you determine which test is better fit with your abilities.
Recognizing Home School Diplomas for College Admittance and Financial Aid
Colleges and universities frequently ask two questions about home schoolers: (1) Are home schoolers eligible for financial aid without obtaining a GED or passing an ability-to-benefit test? and (2) Can a university admit a student with a home school high school diploma who is under the age of compulsory attendance and still retain its eligibility for federal funding? The answer to both questions is “Yes.” This analysis of the Higher Education Act Amendments of 1998 explains what post-secondary schools could require of home school applicants and how homeschooled students are eligible for financial aid.
Home-Schooled Students & Admission: Your Child's Unique Approach to the Process
Each college evaluates home-schooled applicants differently. Some colleges admit many home schoolers. Others have yet to admit one. Either way, your child needs to take extra admission steps.
Admissions Decision-Making Models: How U.S. Institutions of Higher Education Select Undergraduate Students
This report examines how institutions make admissions decisions. Information from more than 100 institutions, representing all levels of selectivity, forms the basis for this report.
ACT vs SAT: Key differences between the ACT and SAT
ACT vs SAT: which test is a better fit for your student? Students may take whichever test they prefer (assuming there are available testing locations for both tests). If you’re not sure which test your child would prefer, consider the key differences between the ACT and SAT. Some students find that the ACT caters to their strengths more so than the SAT, and vice versa. Need a quick side-by-side comparison of the tests? Check out this ACT vs SAT Comparison Chart.
And What About College?: How Homeschooling Can Lead to Admissions to the Best Colleges & Universities
Get all your questions about helping your homeschooled student apply and get accepted to college answered with this resource. It discusses transcripts, diplomas, education choices, online colleges, and more. If you are worried about whether your homeschooled student can have a successful college search, then this book will help allay those fears and offers good support and information. 
Scholarships
HOPE Scholarships
This list of links provides information to homeschoolers regarding HOPE scholarships.
Financial Aid
Federal Student Aid (FSA)
The U.S. Department of Education's Federal Student Aid (FSA) programs are the largest source of student aid in America, providing nearly 70% of all student financial aid. Help is available to make education beyond high school financially possible for you or your child. The information provided here is designed to assist you in your college planning. It provides you with access to and information about the products and services that you will need throughout the financial aid process. FSA is financial help for students enrolled in eligible programs at participating schools to cover school (a four-year or two-year public or private educational institution, a career school or trade school) expenses, including tuition and fees, room and board, books and supplies, and transportation. Most federal aid is need based. The three most common types of aid are grants, loans, and work-study.
State Colleges & Universities
University System of Georgia
The University System of Georgia offers students higher education options at 34 institutions throughout the state, providing a wide range of academic programming, including certificates, associate, baccalaureate, master's, doctoral and professional degrees.
Universities.com
Universities.com has organized the most extensive collection of Post-Secondary distance learning and on-campus colleges and universities.
Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia
The Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia supervises and regulates the activities of the thirty-two institutions of the University System. Of particular interest and concern to homeschoolers is the fact that the Board of Regents specifies a "college preparatory curriculum" as a requirement for admission, and other admissions requirements.
Community Colleges in Georgia
American Association of Community Colleges (AACC)
Founded in 1920, the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) has, over four decades, become the leading proponent and the national “voice for community colleges.” Today, AACC’s membership represents close to 95 percent of all accredited U.S. two-year community, junior and technical colleges and their 10.5 million students, as well as a growing number of international members in Puerto Rico, Japan, Great Britain, Korea, and the United Arab Emirates. The colleges are the largest and fastest-growing sector of U.S. higher education, enrolling close to half (45 percent) of all U.S. undergraduates. AACC supports and promotes its member colleges through policy initiatives, innovative programs, research and information and strategic outreach to business and industry and the national news media.
Featured Resources

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They're Your Kids: An Inspirational Journey from Self-Doubter to Home School Advocate
For many people, their schooling was uncomfortable, tedious, and sometimes a waste of time and energy. This book offers the idea that the public school system is tragically flawed and that we are able to do better for our own children. Sam Sorbo, mom of three and wife of actor Kevin Sorbo, took the leap into homeschooling and found the joy and success she was seeking. Included are strategies for working parents, those who are scared to take the leap, and anyone who wants the best for their child...
Don't Waste Your Time Homeschooling: 72 Things I Wish I'd Known
Traci Matt, a veteran homeschool mom helps you make the most of your homeschooling efforts. She takes a look back at 20 years of successes and challenges, offering tested strategies to assist you on your home education journey. This book will help you learn ways to keep a peaceful home, stay out of the isolation trap, practice self-care, learn how to live with teens, and respond to the questions of others.
Crash-Proof Your Kids: Make Your Teen a Safer, Smarter Driver
Every year, six million sons and daughters will become first-time drivers. Fifty-eight percent of them will be involved in a car accident within a year of getting their license, and a significant portion of these crashes will be fatal. But here's the good news: research has shown that car crashes can be reduced by up to 30 percent when you, the parent, are actively involved in your teen's instruction and set certain limits. In Crashproof Your Kids, certified driving instructor and dad Timothy ...
A Charlotte Mason Education
The immensely popular ideas of Charlotte Mason have inspired educators for many decades. Her unique methodology as written about in her six-volume series established the necessary protocols for an education above and beyond that which can be found in traditional classroom settings. In A Charlotte Mason Education, Catherine Levison has collected the key points of Charlotte Mason's methods and presents them in a simple, straightforward way that will allow families to quickly maximize the opportuni...
Designing Your Own Classical Curriculum: A Guide to Catholic Home Education
In this book, Laura Berquist offers a curriculum based on the philosophy of the classical Trivium: grammar, logic, and rhetoric. This valuable tools helps home educators craft a liberal arts curriculum that is good for both the soul and the intellect. The material in the book covers grades K-12 and has detailed and practical advice. There is also a section for a high school curriculum and a list of resources.