Homeschooling in Georgia

History of Homeschooling in America

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History of Homeschooling in Georgia & America
How did homeschooling start? When did it become legal? Who were the key players in making homeschooling the social movement it is today? The story of the history of homeschooling in the United States is a compelling tale of dedication, innovative ideas, and personal conviction and sacrifice. We have put together a history of this educational and social phenomenon, hoping it will inspire you to learn from the early and more recent pioneers of home education in America.

 
What is Homeschooling?
  Homeschooling means different things to different people. It is a movement rich in diversity and schools of thought. Explore what homeschooling is from different perspectives.

The Legal Journey
  Learn about the legal, social, political, and philosophical journey towards legal homeschooling in the United States.

Important People
  Who are the pioneers in the homeschooling movement? These are the movers and shakers of the early homeschooling movement and also a look at those who have continued work through the years.

Famous Homeschoolers
  Know of anyone who was homeschooled? We'll bet you do. Browse through these listings of famous people in history that were educated at home. You might be surprised!

The Business of Homeschooling
  Explore the business side of homeschooling. As the number of homeschoolers continues to grow, the art of marketing to homeschoolers increases in significance. We take a look at the demographics of the homeschool market and homeschooling businesses. Also of interest is the relationship between the homeschooling market and corporate entities.


Articles Back to Top
A Brief History of American Homeschooling
Linda Dobson
A short history of homeschooling in America from its roots in the family-centered lifestyle of the nineteenth century to today. Includes a general discussion of the evolution of homeschooling in the twentieth century.
A Homeschooler's History of Homeschooling - Part 3: 1990-1992
Cheryl Seelhoff
The years 1990-1992 marked an important turning point in the homeschooling movement. Cheryl Seelhoff looks at this important time. She explores educational philosophies as a source of division, the home-centered living movement, the issue of remarried homeschoolers, the expertization of homeschooling, and more.
A Homeschooler's History of Homeschooling - Part 5: The Gentle Spirit Controversy
Cheryl Seelhoff
Cheryl Seelhoff discusses the controversy between her and other homeschool movement leaders.
Brief History of Homeschooling Legislation in GA
This is a short listing of some of the legislation and advocates for homeschooling in Georgia.
Georgia insight on History of Home Study Law in Georgia
This timeline details the important events leading to the growth of the homeschool movement in Georgia.
History of Home Study Law in Georgia
Georgia Insight
A look at the history of home education in the state of Georgia from 1978 to the present. Discusses the influence of Georgians for Freedom in Education (GFE).
Homeschooling: Back to the Future?
Isabel Lyman
Explore some of the history of the homeschooling movement, why some parents choose to homeschool, the basics of homeschooling, and more. The article includes some homeschooling statistics and demographic information. Also included is a discussion of the influences of Dr. Raymond Moore and John Holt on the emerging homeschool movement.
HSLDA: Our History
HSLDA
Although HSLDA has changed over the past 30 years—in terms of the size of our membership and staff and our physical location—our original vision and purpose remain unchanged. HSLDA exists expressly for the purpose of advocating family and freedom.
On the Edge of the 21st Century
HSLDA
The right to home school is based on two fundamental principles of liberty: religious freedom and parental rights. Whenever one of these two freedoms is threatened, our right to home school is in jeopardy. Here are the battles we think home educators will be facing as we enter the next century:
The History of Homeschooling in the United States and Georgia
Mary Jo Patterson and Ruth Martin
About 60,000 - 75,000 of those 2 million students live in Georgia and are happily and legally learning at home. This has not always been the case. There were families quietly homeschooling their children in Georgia in the 1970’s. The operative word here is "quietly." In order to home school legally, a parent had to inform the local superintendent and get permission to operate as a private school. Most superintendents were not cooperative. The other option was to homeschool underground. If the local school authorities discovered parents who were homeschooling, they threatened them with fines and jail for failing to comply with the compulsory attendance law. These parents would either comply or quickly move out of the superintendent’s jurisdiction.
The Politics of Survival: Home Schoolers and the Law
Scott W. Somerville, Esq.
Twenty years ago, home education was treated as a crime in almost every state. Today, it is legal all across America, despite strong and continued opposition from many within the educational establishment. How did this happen? This paper traces the legal and sociological history of the modern home school movement, and then suggests factors that led to this movement's remarkable success.

Links Back to Top
American Education History Tour
John Taylor Gatto, author of "The Underground History of American Education," has composed this graphic representation of the real history of the education establishment in America.


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